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  • Anurag Thakur refutes perjury charges, says that he did not lie on oath

    December 22, 2016

    BCCI chief, Anurag Thakur, finally broke his silence and said that he had not lied under oath and thus, there was no question of perjury.

    The President of Board of Control for Cricket in India (BCCI), Anurag Thakur, was accused of perjury by the Supreme Court on 15th December, 2016 and was directed to either apologise or face the contempt proceedings.

    The SC had criticized the BCCI chief, Anurag Thakur, for misleading the court after he submitted an affidavit where he denied seeking any letter from the International Cricket Council (ICC) against the government interference, when the Indian board was ordered to implement the Justice RM Lodha-led panel's recommendations. When the affidavit was being filed by the BCCI President in October he agreed to the fact that, during the ICC's financial review meeting in Dubai in August, he had requested the ICC chief Shashank Manohar for clarification on whether the suggested reforms would be viewed as government interference or not.

    The apex court is yet to give its final verdict on the implementation of the Justice RM Lodha Panel recommendations.

    The perjury allegation started when the chief executive officer of International Cricket Council (ICC), David Richardson, made a statement that the BCCI chief had verbally requested ICC chief Shashank Manohar to write a letter alleging government interference. The BCCI chief has denied any such communication with David Richardson.

    Anurag Thakur further made a statement that about 85% of the recommendations made by Justice RM Lodha Panel have already been implemented and periodic meetings are being held to implement the remaining recommendations. Thakur also stated that various efforts have been made by BCCI to approach the Lodha panel with regard to certain recommendations that appear to be a little impractical, but the panel has not been able to give time for the same.

    The BCCI chief further stated that the Indian cricket team both men and women are performing exceptionally well and have been awarded with crores of rupees for their service to the country, this is something that no other sports organisation has done and thus the pressure being created on BCCI is unnecessary.


    OUR TAKE

    The conflict between the Supreme Court and BCCI, with regard to implementation of Lodha panel recommendations, has been going on since a long time. If Anurag Thakur does not apologise to the court he shall be held liable for perjury, and the court may award him imprisonment that may be extended up to 10 years. Thus, it would be better that the BCCI chief, instead of making public statements should apologise to the court in order to escape contempt proceedings.
     


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